Deja’s Butternut Pumpkin Soup [Inspired by Rainbow Rowell’s Pumpkinheads]

I just recently finished my second read through of Rainbow Rowell’s Pumpkinheads and was reminded of why it’s still my go-to festive read for Spooktober. Pumpkinheads gives me all the feels and all the vibes. A nostalgic celebration of the American fall, Pumpkinheads follows seasonal best friends, Deja and Joise and they prepare to leave their days at the pumpkin patch behind forever. It’s wholesome and deeply sentimental – like pumpkin spice goodness on a crisp autumn morning. πŸ‚πŸŽƒ

Anyway, to capture the cozy fall aesthetic of the pumpkin patch, I wanted to share my personal recipe for a classic [and easy] butternut pumpkin soup. It’s comforting, hearty and packed with essential vitamins and nutrients. So, grab your apron and let’s get cooking!

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β˜… 1 litre of vegetable stock
β˜… 40 grams of salted butter
β˜… 1 brown onion [finely chopped]
β˜… 2 cloves of garlic [crushed]
β˜… 1.5 Kilogram butternut pumpkin [peeled, chopped into 1.5 centimetre cubes]
β˜… Salt and pepper
β˜… Chives [for aesthetic]
β˜… Thickened cream to taste
β˜… Seeded sour dough to serve

Note: standard Australian cooking recipes/measurements use the metric system. For all my American friends, I’ve tried [key word here] to convert the measurements… You might need to round it up??? [What even IS this system??? πŸ˜‚].

β˜… 4.2267528377 US cups of vegetable stock
β˜… 1.411 ounces of salted butter
β˜… 3 pounds and 4.911 ounces butternut squash [peeled, chopped into 0.5 inch cubes]

Note: butternut pumpkins [or butternut squash if you don’t live in Australia] have a notoriously tough skin. When preparing, it’s always important to take your time. Sure, it may be the spooky season but nobody wants to lose a finger IRL. #safetyfirst.

  1. Making sure that you have a sturdy breadboard and a sharp knife and peeler, start by cutting off the top and bottom ends of your butternut pumpkin.
  2. Then, using a peeler, remove the skin – make sure you get it all!
  3. Cut your butternut pumpkin into haves and use a spoon to remove the seeds.
  4. Finally, start cutting your butternut pumpkin into cubes. Don’t worry about being too precise, but you want your cubes to be approximately 1.5 centimetres squared.
  5. Set your pumpkin aside and finely dice your brown onion.
  6. Finally, peel your two cloves of garlic and crush.

You’re all ready to go! [FYI – if you want to cheat your food prep, look for some pre-cut pumpkins at your local grocer].

  1. Heat your butter in a large saucepan over medium heat, taking care not to let the butter burn. Add your garlic and onion then sautΓ© for about 4-5 minutes, stirring occasionally. You want your onion to be soft and starting to color.
  2. Add your butternut pumpkin and vegetable stock to the saucepan, stir and bring to the boil.
  3. Once boiled, cover and allow your soup to simmer for 10 minutes.
  4. Uncover and cook for a further 15-20 minutes, adding a pinch of salt and pepper. Your pumpkin should be very tender before you start processing so adjust time frame if needed.
  5. Allow your soup to stand and cool for about 5 minutes.
  6. Using a stick blender, puree until your soup is smooth and consistent.
  7. Ladle soup into a bowl and serve with a drizzle of cream and a side of seeded sour dough. Season to taste [I love to add chives too].

I hope you enjoyed this first installment of Alexandra’s Bookish Baking. Be sure to let me know if you try out my recipe! What do you love to cook or bake during the spooky season? Let me know in the comments below!

Alexandra
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11 thoughts on “Deja’s Butternut Pumpkin Soup [Inspired by Rainbow Rowell’s Pumpkinheads]

  1. Alexandra I love this post!! (although reading it at midnight was maybe not a good idea because I’m hungry now… hmm… should I go get a midnight snack… hmm much thought). It looks super delicious I might have to try it this season ❀ Also I am very impressed you use an actual pumpkin haha I'm lazy and just use canned puree whenever I make pumpkin goodies, although I'm sure that doesn't taste as good. aLso haHA the American measurement system is really stupid 11/10 agree I've been using it my whole life and I still don't know conversions. I have to use the metric system for science and it makes so much senseeee and then I go back to the real world and it's like here are these useless numbers there are 5280 feet in a mile instead of 1000 meters in a kilometer. (although butter is measured in either cups or tablespoons, sometimes by the stick, not ounces lmao nothing makes sense). thanks for all the fall ~vibes~

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hahaha cooking up some pumpkin soup at midnight is always the way to go! πŸ˜‰ If you do try it be sure to send me a picture! [I’m actually cooking it again tonight for Halloween].

      To be honest, I was seriously regretting using an actual pumpkin. I mean, in the long run the soup tastes better but holy moley – cutting it was a LOT of work! I had blisters all over my hands. I’m thinking next time I might be lazy a opt for the pre-cut pumpkins… πŸ˜‚

      Lol thank you so much – I had SO MUCH trouble trying to figure out those conversions. Like, who even came up with this??? I have a newfound respect for your cooking skills because I would be lost!

      Happy Halloween, Kay! [in Australia anyway!] πŸ’™

      Like

  2. This is so amazing and delicious looking??? I am a hopeless cook, XD
    I’m reading Pumpkinheads this month, I decided to wait until October like you recc’d. So excited!
    Emma xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ahhhh, I’m so excited to see what you thought of Pumpkinheads! I’s honestly so cozy and cute. Actually, I’ve already read it this month and I’m thinking of reading it again on Halloween??? I’m THAT obsessed!

      Also, from one hopeless cook to another, nobody – and I mean NOBODY – can mess up pumpkin soup! πŸ˜‰ πŸ’™

      Liked by 1 person

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